SSOSPC-Initiative Focus

Initiative Focus

Strengthening & Sustaining Ohio’s Suicide Prevention Coalition Initiative

Community Coalition Action Theory (CCAT)

As part of the SSOSPC Initiative, five coalitions across Ohio received funding to study and apply the Community Coalition Action Theory (CCAT) to enhance the efforts of their suicide prevention coalitions.  The CCAT was developed in 2002 by two community-based researchers, Fran Butterfoss and Michelle Kegler, who described the critical elements of effective data-driven, action-oriented, community-based groups (e.g., coalitions, consortium, HUBs). In their chapter, they explain the importance of the elements and offer applied examples of how they work. Coalitions Funded in 2020

  • Ashtabula County Suicide Prevention Coalition
  • Butler County Suicide Prevention Coalition
  • Clermont County Suicide Prevention Coalition
  • Franklin County Suicide Prevention Coalition
  • River Hills Prevention Connection (Lawrence County)

To support these coalitions as they study and apply the CCAT with their local group, Ohio University’s Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs and the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation developed a web-based training series. The training series provides informational videos, guidance documents, and handouts for each step of the CCAT process.


Community Readiness Assessment (CRA)

The Strengthening and Sustaining Ohio’s Suicide Prevention Coalitions (SSOSPC) Initiative provides grantees the opportunity to conduct a Community Readiness Assessment (CRA). Community readiness assessments help communities understand how ready a community is to address an issue that is impacting the health of the community. In addition, community readiness assessments help communities match interventions to the community’s level of readiness, thereby facilitating success. The assessment is part of the Tri-Ethnic Community Readiness Model developed by the Tri-Ethnic Center for Prevention Research at Colorado State University. To support coalitions as they conduct their CRA, Ohio University’s Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs and the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation developed a web-based training series. The training series is broken down into segments that provide informational videos, guidance documents, and handouts for each step of the CRA process.


CDC Seven Strategies

The SSOSPC Initiative seeks to enhance the work of suicide prevention coalitions to align with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) strategies for preventing suicide.  The CDC provides a technical package on preventing suicide, which highlights seven strategies based on the best available evidence to help states and communities prevent suicide. To support exploration of the CDC’s Technical Package for Preventing Suicide, coalitions will learn more about the concept of “wicked problems” (Rittel & Webber, 1972). Exploring suicide as a wicked problem and deepening understanding of the distinguishing properties of wicked problems will contribute to focusing on prevention activities with the greatest potential to prevent suicide. These strategies, as identified by the CDC, include: (1) strengthening economic supports; (2) strengthening access and delivery of suicide care; (3) creating protective environments; (4) promoting connectedness; (5) teaching coping and problem-solving skills; (6) identifying and supporting people at risk; and (7) lessening harms and preventing future risk. For more information on the CDC’s seven suicide prevention strategies, please visit:


Working together to enhance the work of suicide prevention coalitions across Ohio